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Friday, October 28, 2016

Steven Yeun Already Has A New Job

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

The Donut King

Donut King Ted Ngoy overcame poverty and escaped genocide, made a fortune off of doughnuts and gambled it all away.

Sunday, October 16, 2016

The Asian American Beat w/ Jeff Yang

Jeff Yang talks about his years of experience covering Asian American issues as a journalist. He also weighs in on the latest Mulan script leak and the momentum of Asian Americans in the media.

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Achieve something you can brag about. Be modest enough to not

I recently stumbled upon your Alpha Asian and Strength and Physique blogs. Also read a few of your articles on Thank you for sharing the knowledge and value. 

I am also a police officer and have a lot of respect for the fact that you are able to do all these things on the side while juggling a full time career on the job. Imagine it must take a lot of dedication and persistence in the face of naysayers. You are an inspiration. Keep up the good work. 


My Answer: Well thanks, G.  I try to live by these words from Bruce:

"Freedom discovers you the moment you lose concern
 over what impression you are making or about to make."

For every action you take there is going to be an equal and opposite criticism.  But you don't have to get things perfect.  You just have to get them going.  If you spend too much time thinking about a project, you'll never get it done.  Screw it.  Just do it.

"You can't let perfection get in the way of completion.  
A finished bad book is better than a half finished good book." 
-Gene Luen Yang

Speaking of good books, Asian American blogger Ben Efsaneyim has written a historical thriller called The Legend of Fu

When Chinese merchant, Fu, rescues a white woman from a brothel in late 19th Century California, it unleashes a series of events that land him in the middle of a deadly mystery. Pursued by two vicious assailants, Fu and the woman make their way to the San Francisco Chinatown, hoping to hide out until the men chasing them lose their trail. 

When he has a violent encounter with the men in a deserted lane in Chinatown, Fu realizes that he has become embroiled in intrigue that threatens to destroy Chinatown and end the Chinese presence in America. 

A racist mob descends on Chinatown, intent on burning it to the ground and expelling its residents, as Fu and the mysterious woman unite in an effort to solve the intrigue to which she unwittingly holds the key.

The story takes place against the backdrop of actual historical events – namely the decades-long persecution of Chinese migrants on the West Coast. For example, the mob in the novel is based on an actual anti-Chinese mob attack that took place in San Francisco in 1877 involving eight-thousand people.

To be honest with you, when I first heard the premise for this novel, I thought, "Jeez, this sounds depressing.  Chinese people getting lynched by angry white mobs."

But the Legend of Fu is a very intriguing and fast paced novel where the Chinese aren't just victims, but are actively resisting the assault on their community.  I was actually surprised and impressed by the ending when the mystery was revealed.

Definitely buy this book and give it a read.  Ben and I intend on doing a podcast in the future, so keep an eye out for that.